Saturday, February 9, 2008

Peach Pocket Pies

For the past few days I've been craving... and I mean craving... a pocket pie. A peach pocket pie. It's strange; usually anything that doesn't involve chocolate is, in my humble opinion, a waste of precious dessert-allotted calories.

But I was thinking last night of peach pocket pies and suddenly I sat up straight(ish) in bed and gasped, My gosh, I don't have my Peach Pocket Pie recipe in the write-up of my cookbook. And just as suddenly I realized that I'd left out Potato Marbles and Carrot Ribbons and Corn Cakes. Where have I been? I thought I was finished with the recipes? What?

I'd always heard that pocket pies got their grand and glorious start in European mining communities. Using leftover meat and vegetables, wives would send their dutiful coal mining husbands off to work each morning with dinner scraps sealed inside baked-up crusts. Once lunch came around so would the miners and their pies, and together they'd heat their homemade hot pockets on shovels placed over burning coals.

I took that to be the history of the pocket pie until I read, just this week, that the baked beauties are also rumored to have begun in the pre-Victorian era, when cooks would tuck meat or fruit into pastry scraps and bake up several for the children of the house. They were, of course, easier for the little ones to handle and finish off than a proper meal. For those reasons, they soon became popular with servants and slaves as well.

But sure. The Greeks have their kolokotes. The Polish their pierogi. The Italians their calzone. The Spanish their empanada. But in the deep south, where I come from, it's all hail the fried pie.

Only I don't fry mine. Shoot me now, but I bake them up in the most flaky and delicate of sour cream crusts. Plus, in saving all the greasy calories, you can eat an extra one or get yours with a scoop of Blue Bell Natural Vanilla Bean ice cream.

So, hmmm. Guess it's my peach pocket pies at the firepit tonight. (Oh, hello footing. Is that you I'm finding again?) Because I could cry over him forever but I just can't. Not as long as I still have the perfect peach pocket pie recipe to share....

18 comments:

Mod Girl said...

Divine -- my mouth is watering! Beautiful photos, too, as always.

Becky K. said...

Good for you, girl!
I am so glad that you are sharing your experiences and feelings. Your writing is amazing!
Off to make some pockets with whatever I can find to stuff them with...
Becky K.

Sue@CountryPleasures said...

Writing is healing, so happy for you to get it all out! Teasing us again with that cookbook, can't wait for it!! I'll have to beg you for a autographed copy! lol

Jenny said...

Yum! I've been wanting to make some apple ones, like mini apple pies.

Please include the potato marbles in your book, too. They sound like lots of fun.

Hugs,
Jenny

Rosa said...

Yum! I hope we won't have to wait too long for that cookbook. I need a good fried pie recipe. Not to mention all the other good things you've been teasing us with! (I really want to know how to can the soup... and the apple pie filling...)
http://rose-gardendiary.blogspot.com

odd dotty said...

Hi, I just found your blog today, and have only read a few posts. But, I can already tell that I will be visiting here more often! You are a beautiful writer, and I love your candor and boldness in sharing your faith, not to mention the yummy photos. Thank you!

sister sheri said...

So, are you going to let us pre-order the cookbook? And when's the new website coming? Anticipation!

Mayberry Magpie said...

Love the new banner design!

I've never made pocket pies, probably because I have crust-inferiority. But peach pie is one of my favorites. I can taste it just looking at your photos.

Beth said...

I order my peach pocket pie with vanilla bean ice cream, thank you. :) God has provided beauty for all our senses, including the taste bud. And, I too, have found His beauty to be very healing. It warms my heart to hear you write about it.

Lynne's Somewhat Invented Life said...

You are a beautiful writer and, obviously, baker. The photo's are beautiful. I wandered in from Main Street Memories and wandered in there from...who knows?

I'm glad to know your life is thrilling. As it should be.

~athena~ said...

I'm new to your blog, too, and to blogging in general (just restarted my own) but wanted to say that your writing is amazing and the space you've created feels very authentic and sincere.

Feel free to visit my blog too, www.soulimpressions.blogspot.com
Cheers to you! Your strength is an inspiration.

fiona d said...

In Cornwall, in the south west of England, among the tin mines, they would be called pasties - the tin mines are all closed but the pasty is still going strong. In one English county, Bedfordshire, they make a version called a clanger - with a meat filling at one end and a fruit filling at the other, divided by a little wall of pastry down the middle. These would be for the farm labourers long ago to take out into the fields for their midday meal - main course and pudding all in one.

Vee ~ A Haven for Vee said...

Alas, none of that Blue Bell ice cream that you Texans always speak of in my corner. So perhaps I can safely avoid temptation if I stop looking at your beautiful photos.

No man is worth too many tears. I am thrilled that you are choosing...a calculated act of the will...to go forward. Yay!

Terri and Bob said...

What is it about warm peaches and buttery crust that makes me want to hug someone? I love this post. I am learning a lot about using voice in writing through reading yours!

Sissy said...

Very quickly I have become addicted to your blog. I think the internet has become an awesome way for Christian women to link up and support each other.

I love the recipes and like the others, that cookbook is highly anticipated. I am going to try the chicken-bacon things this week.

Oh, about emotional posts. I totally agree that writing is cathartic. In my own life lately I have been struggling with trusting Him with my heart. But my blog allows me to get it out and get on with it.

Lallee said...

Oh delish!!!!

My name is not Scarlett. said...

I cannot wait to make these luscious treats. Love reading about your journey. All the best to you!

Anonymous said...

In Upper Peninsula Michigan the miners took similar pies but they are called pasties. Meat, potatoes, rudabagas,and carrots.